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How to Make a Meaningful Hospital Visit in 10 Minutes or Less

I find that hospital visits can be some of the most challenging yet rewarding opportunities for ministry.  The few minutes that I get to spend with those who are hospitalized is a reminder to them of God’s love and the power of his healing hand.  While this ministry is necessary and crucial to the life of the local church, it is by its very nature time consuming.

If several patients are located in multiple hospitals spread across the city, the drive time alone can turn into hours.  I had to find a way to make the best use of the time in the hospital room. Here is one way to make a meaningful hospital visit in 10 minutes or less.

  • A 10 minute hospital visit begins with a phone call. Good information can save you a lot of time. If you work with an assistant, have him/her call the hospital ahead of time and verify that the person you are going to see is still there and the room number. A text message or email to your phone with that information is invaluable.  If you operate better with pen and paper, make a note of some kind.  I can promise you that phone calls during the drive to the hospital will mess with your memory.
  • Familiarize yourself with the hospital layout. This is one of the things that I accomplish as quickly as possible upon arrival in a new city. You do not want to be confused with directions to the hospital, where to park, or which entrance will be put closest to the Unit where you are needed at 2 o’clock in the morning. At 2 a.m., the news will not be good and you had better get there quickly.
  • Remember your SLIPPR (pronounced “slipper”)
  • Sympathize – Express your heartfelt concern for their condition.

    “I am so sorry to hear of your illness, injury, surgery, etc.”

    “We have already been praying for you.”

    Listen – Give them an opportunity to tell you what they wish to tell. Depending upon the person, this may be detailed or incredibly brief.

    In any case, listening well is listening intently. Most people can tell when you are somewhere else in your head. Listening says, “I genuinely care.”

    Inquire Ask a couple of clarifying questions. It will help you remember but it will also help them be confident that you are listening.

    Ask if there are any needs or concerns that you or others might fulfill. Ask about their condition, how they are feeling, or if they know when they will be dismissed to go home if they have not already told you.

    Pray – Express your thanks to God for them.

    Detail in prayer your appreciation for them and what they mean to you personally.  Ask God to heal and bless them.

    Plan – Give them an idea of when, where, or how you will be in contact again.

    “Would you please give us a call in office if you are dismissed today? Otherwise I’ll see you tomorrow, Tuesday, in the morning, etc.”

    Leave them looking forward to another visit.

    Report – Call your assistant as you leave and give him/her any information that may need to be forwarded to others. This call also facilitates timely update of the Church Prayer List.

Do you have a technique that has served you well? I want to hear about it!

Thanks Harold!

Harold Camping proclaimed that the world would end on May 21. He missed it, badly. In the aftermath, every criticism that you can imagine has been fired in his direction. Journalists and commentators have had a field day turning him into a caricature. Critics have used his failed prediction to marginalize or in some cases denounce religion in general. However, is it possible that we have missed the silver lining in Camping’s own personal storm?

For the better part of a month, I have met people who were willing to discuss an issue that would otherwise be socially “off limits”. Political correctness has intimidated many Believers into virtual silence. Romans 1:28, describes sinners who do not like to be reminded of even the existence of God, but for a brief few weeks there was a willingness to consider that which had been consistently ignored.

Now that Harold Camping has been stricken with what may well be a life ending stroke, the subject is bound to come up again. For that reason I remind you of the words of Peter, “But sanctify the Lord God in your hearts, and always be ready to give a defense to everyone who asks you a reason for the hope that is in you, with meekness and fear;” 1Peter 3:15 NKJV (emphasis mine).

Have you had an opportunity to discuss eternal things because of Camping’s predictions?       I’d love to hear about it!